Tag Archive | Tara

We Don’t Give a Damn, Scarlett: Jonesboro, Georgia

Living Unthinking over Unmarked Graves

 

Before I found Jonesboro, I was sure Tara, Scarlett O’Hara’s plantation, didn’t exist. (And it doesn’t. Gone With the Wind was fiction, people!)  Still, like most Northerners and lots of Southerners and other Earthlings, I “learned” most of what I “knew” about the South watching that movie.  I think it was re-run on TV every year when I was a kid, as if it were our own national epic, like the Odyssey was to the Greeks.  Weird, since the narrative is slanted to make us feel sorry for our former enemies. Weirder still, our epic’s enemies were, and still are, within “us.”

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For our trips into the southeast, Atlanta would be the eternal crossroads, all flights and roads eventually leading there–even to Rome, Georgia.  One trip South led me in and out of Atlanta at least four times.  On this trip, I discovered “Tara” was close to the airport, so I squeezed in a visit.

Tara Boulevard is actually an exit off Interstate 75.  Imagine if there were an exit for Oz outside Kansas City or one for Middle Earth outside Wellington, New Zealand—but wait, there probably are, complete with kiddie rides, witches, wizards, and/or hobbits. We’re inured to fakery. Tara Boulevard is real but doesn’t lead to hoopskirts, waltzes, and refinement. It is one of the most scaborously ugly suburban roads in the South, and that’s saying something.  It’s lined by billboards for accident lawyers and struggling businesses in strip malls, rows of used tire shops, tattoo parlors, and, of course, those other heralds of American down-market capitalism, wig and pawn shops. The unrelieved ugliness sprawled for miles. Even the Southern cookin’ place along the oddly foodless strip served dried-out fried catfish with catatonic indifference.

Yet, just off the boulevard, the town of Jonesboro was a marvel, shilling its claim to be the inspiration for Tara in Margaret Mitchell’s imagination.  Jonesboro clung to antebellum history with a few gracious houses, like the privately owned 1840 Warren home, where a war hospital had been set up during the Civil War . I knew Jonesboro was a key historic battle, completing Sherman’s conquest of Atlanta.  Even though I didn’t yet know Jonesboro buried a subchapter in my own family history, I was mainly curious about seeing the battlefield.

But there was nothing to see.  I couldn’t believe the town had done nothing to commemorate the battle, so I stopped at the visitor center/ museum to find out more.

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An old rail depot housed a Tara Tour in the county’s “history” center.  The Official Clayton County Visitors Bureau claimed to be the True South, complete with a website (http://www.visitscarlett.com) with a crackling soundtrack of Atlanta burning arrayed around a cameo of Scarlett and Rhett smooching. Puzzled by hulking busses unloading Italian and Japanese tourists suckered into the gift shop, I ran smack into the garrulous Tiffany, a clerk and history student who gave me her version of Jonesboro’s realities.  It was interesting to meet someone even more cynical than I about phony history and America’s gradual Disneyland-ization of everything.  She talked, I listened amid the “history” museum as an endless spool of Gone with the Wind played on the video screen and foreign tourists studied movie gowns and other memorabilia in glass cases—you know, authentic American historic artifacts.  The movie scene played Scarlett’s slaves’ confusion about the attack on Atlanta for comic relief.

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Tiffany confirmed the town’s lack of real Civil War commemoration.  “The town, especially the north end, IS the battlefield,” she told me, “and hundreds of residents live unthinking over unmarked graves of combatants.”  The last remnant of the battlefield was about to disappear, a developer having won an easement to build a parking lot over it.

Tiffany showed me the museum’s tiny corner devoted to the Jonesboro battle story, saying that locals really weren’t interested in either the battle or Gone With the Wind, only tourists, especially foreign ones. She was also forthright and irreverent about her version of Civil War and Southern history in general, asserting that the Confederacy’s General Hood was a fool, (living out his last years as a “drunk on a front porch”), that the Union’s General Sherman was indeed a rough prick (with slaves of his own via wife’s family in Missouri) and a war criminal; that Lincoln was also merciless—“a dictator, suspending habeas corpus.”  Tiffany claimed that many Northerners were relieved when Lincoln was assassinated.

I returned to Tara Boulevard bit shocked at the town’s lack of concern for the battlefield.  All museums engage in marketing one way or another, but I’d never seen such overt pandering, such shameless dumbing-down of history.  Clayton County ignores our true shared past, speaking to our Hollywood hearts, not our brains.  Heading back to Atlanta, I endured Tara’s ugly roadside again, wondering why we don’t give a damn, Scarlett, about living in sprawling commercial squalor while we idolize gracious country estates that never existed; why we cover our past—our sacred ground–under pawn shops, wig outlets, and funeral parlor parking lots.

I would soon find out that my own blood had a claim on that real estate.