Tag Archive | Murrell plantation

Free of Fake History in Tahlequah, and a Rogue Klansman Across the Border

Free of fake history, but decked out in early 19th Century native Indian costumes, Travis and Jennifer spoke with straight-ahead 21st Century bluntness.  In the hallway of Oklahoma’s only antebellum plantation, we had a hurried, intense conversation before a troop of giddy schoolkids arrived on a field trip.  I was glad the kids would have these two student interns as guides.

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When asked about Southern identity, Travis told us he was Cherokee first, Oklahoman second, and “not really much Southern at all.”  From the eastern border with Arkansas, he seemed surprised that anybody would assume otherwise.  His fellow docent at the Murrell Plantation, Jennifer, felt Choctaw first, but strongly Southern, too.  She’d grown up close to Texas in far south Oklahoma and felt the pull of the heritage.Image

George and I met them in the rural, 1840’s mansion set in the rolling green pasture and woodland south of Tahlequah. Rumored to be haunted, it sure felt Southern, oozing gracious living with spacious interiors, period furnishings, and rough shacks just outside. This excellent restoration of Oklahoma’s only remaining antebellum plantation told the tale of rich European-American fortunes wed to Indian tragedy, just after the Trail of Tears exiled Cherokees, Creeks, Choctaws and other tribes from Carolina and Tennessee.  The plantation filled us with questions about the ownership of slaves and their role in the family’s success; Murrell himself had ties to the Confederacy.

Travis and Jennifer both felt their history educations steered them away from such Oklahoma atrocities as the 1921 Tulsa riots (not mentioned at all in their schooling).  In their texts, the Trail of Tears “got a paragraph” Travis said, squeezing his thumb and forefinger.  We talked about the pressure not to discuss painful episodes from history.  The two young Indians felt their elders did not want to disturb the current peace under those old storm clouds.

The wood shacks turned out be early settler cabins moved to the grounds.  When George and I walked a short distance into a natural area, a local man warned us about nearby “wild dogs.”

We learned about  European-American wild dogs at the nearby Cherokee Heritage Museum.  Exhibits told the Trail of Tears narrative, complete with 1830’s documents and re-created sound effects of the terrible conditions, the whiplash of cruelty.   Not only did the whites steal the lands of the Southeastern tribes, but a staggering number of Indians died on the long forced march into Oklahoma.

This history is tough to face, but the museum presents it with dramatic clarity and elegance.  A grace note is that upon leaving the Trail of Tears rooms, the exit takes the visitor through a gallery of native success stories in contemporary Oklahoma.

We had to hit the road, still freaked out by the cruelty of the Trail of Tears narrative.  We were bound for a place that wasn’t necessarily going to make us feel any better:  a town in Arkansas bedeviled by a rogue Klansman and notorious for having expelled its entire African-American population.

George, who is black, was not necessarily happy about my plan to stay there after sundown.